The Beauty of Hello Happy World and Kokoro Tsurumaki

Ayappi here! (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

So a friend of mine recently got me back into playing this mobile game called Bang Dream! Girl’s Band Party. As I played this game again, other than finding out I have lost some of my rhythm game ability,  and that the once failing franchise has really gotten a lot of positive traction lately, I have found some really interesting insights about one of the characters in this franchise.

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One hell of an energetic band I’d say, in a good way

You see when I used to play Bang Dream prior to this, I only focused on my favorite characters: Rimi and Kasumi from PoppinParty. I did a bit of Pastel*Palletes as well, but only because they did the cover for one of my favorite songs, which was Sekai wa Koi ni Ochiteiru. This meant I would leave out or not even bother to interact with the other characters in the game. But this time it’s different, and by going out of my way to explore  and give the other bands a chance, I have found something very interesting that has made me appreciate Hello Happy World better.

I’m talking about Kokoro Tsurumaki, the blonde haired leader of Hello Happy World!, one of the five bands that comprise the Bang Dream franchise as we know it today. As I interacted with her, “interesting” character in the game, I have come to the conclusion that Kokoro Tsurumaki’s character really does encapsulate the spirit of the band Hello Happy World. Allow me to explain why down below!

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Kokoro as we know it, for those who played the game or have her as their best girl/waifu at the least, has a very quirky personality. She’s a rich girl, but her character goes against the typical spoiled, snobbish nature of the blonde rich girl character we often see in shows and other video games, such as Sendoin Kaede from Battle Girl High School or, while not really blonde or anime, Trixie Tang from the Fairly Odd Parents. Instead, we get a more “innocent and happy rich” type of character out of her, hinting the possibility of being sheltered by her parents. If I were to compare her personality with another franchise related to Bushiroad, it would have to be Ohara Mari from LoveLive Sunshine.

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They’re both blonde, rich and energetic. Mari however has lots of mixed blood

She always goes out with a smile, and is really full of energy – enough to rival even some of the most energetic girls that fit in with the “genki girl” stereotype. Remember that happiness is contagious, and that they do often say that the best way to get people to smile is to smile yourself. This is coupled with the fact that she has made Hello Happy World for the purpose of making people happy with the band’s music. Not only that, but whenever I see her interacting with the characters in the Bang Dream game, she always acts younger and definitely quirkier than what is expected of her age, at energy levels usually not found at her age. Her energy, and personality are in my opinion, best described as childlike.

Childlike in a sense, that, I’m pretty sure at some point in most of us, we just want to make the world happy. We just want to innocently spread happiness, love and friendship to all of the people we meet in the world, while at the same time being super energetic that it might serve as an annoyance to some people. And I think this ties in really well with the whole concept that makes Hello Happy World what it is – to spread happiness through their music.

Further extending the subject of her childlike disposition and how it embodies Hello Happy World as we know it, elements in her band’s story and even the band’s title really compliment this whole childlike Kokoro. Kaoru Seta, the guitarist of Hello Happy World for example, I remember her story debut in the band’s story where she played the role of a prince in a school play. Shortly afterwards, we get a special cutscene where Kaoru, is in a position that makes her appear like she’s the prince Kokoro (the princess) was looking for this entire time, much like a typical princess fairytale. Again, it compliments being childlike as we normally associate fairy tales with youth and bedtime stories when we were 7 or 8 years old.

Another more obvious childlike element would be the bear costume of Michelle. It reminds us of these huge plush toys that give us joy when we were kids, and I think it ties in very well with the whole concept of making others happy though our music, and the childlike Kokoro.

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Let’s also look at the title, Hello Happy World. If you ever did a bit of programming, the usual first program we create in class is a simple “Hello World” program, showing some sort of greeting to the “world” that we have arrived and are ready to mingle with you. However, the addition of “happy” changes everything. It’s now a greeting addressed to a “happy world.” What is this happy world you might ask? No idea, but judging from Kokoro’s vision of making people happy with their music, it ties in really well again with the whole childlike Kokoro thing I just discussed.

In conclusion, Kokoro’s childlike personality really compliments the whole concept of Hello Happy World. This childlike personality of her has really contributed into her making Hello Happy World, and it does really show. I would say, learning more about her has really did make me appreciate her character more, to the point that I would make her my second favorite character in the entire Bang Dream franchise. No one beats Rimi however, protect that chocolate fountain at all costs.

What do you guys think? Are you a fan of Hello Happy World or at the very least Kokoro? Please do let me know down below and have a great day ahead ❤

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Why Even Bother Playing Visual Novels?

Ayappi here (*´꒳`*)ノ

Who would have thought I wouldn’t have classes (except for one day) for the entire week (*´-`)

Anyway,

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Manga is definitely literature, trust me. My professor approved my essay on Prunus Girl

For the “uninitiated,” you might be asking yourself, what is a visual novel? Is this a fancy term to refer to lengthier manga, the same way graphic novels in the West work? You could be forgiven for thinking that, but if you have ever at any point in time heard about Katawa Shoujo, Doki Doki Literature Club, or have watched Oreimo, then you probably already have encountered visual novels.

It doesn’t take much to run a visual novel, because there aren’t any fancy polygons found in 3D games, or multiple AI’s to stress out the CPU. Literally anyone with a computer capable of running Windows can run visual novels at max settings.

After downloading anywhere from a few megabytes to lots of gigabytes worth of game files from Steam, DLSite or the discs these visual novels come in, we’re ready to play. The way they work is simple, players simply click on the screen to progress with the story. Along the way there might be some choices, where each choice affects what kind of ending the player will get. Games in this genre are usually dating simulators, or bishoujo/otome games featuring cute and/or sexy characters of either sex. Most often than not, these visual novels contain erotic material or hentai as we call it outside of Japan, and are classified as eroge or erotic game (エロゲ).

It’s basically something you’d find in between a manga and an anime. It’s not entirely animated like a normal anime, but it contains voices (sometimes) and contains more room for movement compared to a manga. Most often we read the text too, much like a manga. The way it differs from anime and manga however, is that you’ll need a computer of some sort to run them and keep their game files.

Given that, visual novels seem to be more of a hassle and a waste of time more than anything. I’ve already mentioned its requirements of a computer and the waiting time needed to install and/or download the game files for starters, which in my opinion is one of the biggest supports to this notion. Especially with the latter, I’ve downloaded visual novels that reached up to 4GB in game files alone (I think it was your diary+H). Whiles yes, hard drives are getting cheaper and cheaper, if you compare file sizes to something such as Cities Skylines, a much more intensive game, you begin to question why a visual novel needs 4GB of system storage. You begin to contemplate on how that storage space could have been used up by other games.

Time to buy another 4TB drive

On the subject of storage space, let’s talk about eroge. Eroge visual novels, like their non erotic counterparts still need to be installed in whatever device you own. If you’re one of those people who play these games for the sex scenes, and nothing but the sex scenes, then it might not make sense to even install the game in the first place. I’ve seen countless of times on Booru sites (anime picture compilation sites) such as Danbooru and Gelbooru, the sex scenes found in most eroge. One could easily just type in “game_cg” and the title of the eroge, and you get the full package and more. With this way, not only do you save yourself the time of playing through it, but also storage space on your devices.

But probably a bigger reason, and this is especially because this is a factor in the former two I just mentioned, is that it simply takes up time. For one thing, you’re limited by the devices running these, so that’s effectively downtime if you happen to lose access to your devices at a certain place or time. Installation and downloading is another thing, and this is directly affected by things such as internet speed and compute power. After that, unless you want to just hit “Skip” and not understand anything at all, you’re essentially forced to click or tap your way through the story. That takes up lots of time, even with the text speed set to the maximum. Once you’re done, you either uninstall it, or keep it probably only to uninstall it later on to make way for another game. The time spent getting, playing this game, and uninstalling it could have gone to more productive tasks, or binge read 3 mangas with an anime off to the side.

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You can’t deny that the art is well done

So article over? Visual novels are horrible in concept and you should never play them? The answer really, is a huge it depends.

The reasons I outlined above are coming from my perspective: a university student pressed for time every single day. If you’re also in a time constricted environment, who doesn’t have access 24/7 to the devices where you keep your visual novels, then I really do think visual novels are probably not worth your time. You’ll probably enjoy yourself more reading a manga on the commute, rather than lugging your laptop, playing in public at risk of getting robbed.

However, if you have the time, the storage space, and to a lesser extent the strong enough internet connection, then I don’t see any reason for you to not play visual novels. I mentioned earlier that visual novels are sort of the middleground between anime and manga. There are many things that an anime and manga couldn’t do that a visual novel can do.

One of these things is that, a visual novel could include minigames to better interact with the consumer. Majority of the visual novels in the market do not have these, but there are some who have an extra layer of spice, and I think it helps in the overall immersion in the world of the story. Some examples of these include the famous poem minigame in Doki Doki Literature Club, or this battle mechanic found in Twinkle Crusaders that I personally find interesting (I only seem gameplay of it though, never played this).

You really do feel that it’s happening live

On the subject of immersion, yes it could offer good immersion at levels anime and manga simply cannot offer. Majority of the visual novels are dating simulators, putting you, the player in a self insert character to participate in the story. You, yourself through Mr or Ms. Self Insert interact with the cast of the story firsthand. Oftentimes, you call the shots and not the writer of the story, through the choices you made.

I know there are anime that have done this sort of self insert main character type of thing, where the characters interact with the viewer. However, in my opinion it’s very awkward to watch, and you’re still purely bound by whatever the writer intended to put inside. Manga might have a better chance at beating visual novels, but I personally have never encountered a “Choose your own Adventure” manga. Please do let me know down below if you know any that exist.

Also, and I think this is one of the strongest points of visual novels over any anime and manga, is that the art is simply noticeably well drawn. I will admit that many times have I gone out of my way to look for particular CG scenes, just to make them my desktop wallpaper. The art in my opinion is just way better compared to standard manga or, heck even anime screenshots from shows made by PA Works. I know this is subjective, but honestly I think visual novels easily destroy anime or manga when it comes to art. It’s on a whole different league in my opinion. To prove it, look at scenes from Hentai Ouji to Warawanai Neko, and the picture somewhere above captioned “you can’t deny the art is well done.” Both are drawn by the illustrator Kantoku.

So yes, personally I’d not play a visual novel simply because I have no time for them. That isn’t to say I wouldn’t play them completely. If given enough pressure from friends, or if I’m genuinely curious about the game, then I will definitely play . But yes, if I could just have a manga version of whatever visual novel is presented to me that would be much appreciated.

However, that’s me, and you’re you. It’s still up to you to decide. Please don’t cut off visual novels completely especially if you have the time. Who knows, you might eventually become obsessed with them in the future. I want to hear your opinions on the matter, so please do comment down below if you want!

Have a nice day and remember to enjoy life and anime/manga that there’s no one else other than Just Monika. ❤